Land subsidence: a Major threat to the World’s capitals

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Downtown Beijing. Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Climate change is a hitting hard on coastal areas, many of which may be inundated and made uninhabitable by 2100, as a consequence of global warming-induced sea level rise. Coupled with this emergency, another one is slowly but relentlessly showing its devastating potential: Land subsidence underneath large cities. Continue reading Land subsidence: a Major threat to the World’s capitals

When mankind almost went extinct…or maybe not

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Image courtesy of NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

For decades, scientists have tried to solve the mystery of one of the most devastating eruption of all time, one that might have almost canceled our civilization from Earth. After 30 years of investigations, volcanologists, paleoclimatologists, geochemists, pointed to the Toba caldera as the culprit for the apocalypse. Continue reading When mankind almost went extinct…or maybe not

A “Deep Impact” story from ancient Antarctica

Comet Hale–Bopp
A recent discovery has spread across scientific journals and newspapers, steering the attention of the media and academics to a topic that is very often ignored: Meteorite impacts. Every time we look at the moon, our satellite reminds us that this phenomenon is usual in our solar system, where we live. A bit far away, the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet hit Jupiter in July 1994, shaking and exciting the entire astronomer community.

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One year ago, when white hell broke loose

 Exactly one year ago, in the late afternoon of January 18, 2017, disaster struck a paradise for the rich, a hideaway for tourists looking for a quiet destination to relax. Al luxurious, 5-star Resort and wellness center in Southern Italy was literally buried underneath a thick cover of snow, ice and tree logs.

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A quaint Italian town and the blast that killed the Dinosaurs

dinosaurLocated along the steep slopes of Mount Ingino in Umbria, Central Italy, the ancient town of Gubbio features a wealth of architectural jewels that testify to its millenary history. The town was founded in the 3rd century b.C. and was annexed by Rome in 85 b.C., as attested by the remanants of a Roman Theater that could host 10,000 visitors. All the churches, fountains and monuments that attract tens of thousands of tourists every year are a living proof of the ability of Italian Medieval and Renaissance architects. Continue reading A quaint Italian town and the blast that killed the Dinosaurs

The world’s fate threatened by Italian supervolcano

The surreal Solfatara Crater, arguably the best known volcanic vent in the Campi Flegrei (Phlegrean Fields), represents the most compelling evidence of the deadly heat that lies underneath the surface. On September 12, 2017, that very heat caused one of the most harrowing tragedies ever brought about by volcanic activity.

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NATO, at the forefront of preventing geological-related disasters

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The gigantic Enguri Dam, and its water reservoir. From “Georgian Journal”, July 27, 2017

An international team of scientists – led by Prof. Alessandro Tibaldi, from Milan Bicocca University – have been working, since November 2015, on a major collaborative research program under the aegis of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO) Science for Peace and Security program. The involved researchers come from Italy, the United States, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Kazakhstan. Continue reading NATO, at the forefront of preventing geological-related disasters

The mystery of Earthquake Lights

Earthquake Lights on September 26, 1966 from the Matsushiro Quake, Japan.

During the Magnitude 8 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 8, 2017, most of the inevitable media hype was on the observation of mysterious blue lightning in the sky during the temblor. The lights witnessed by thousands of witnesses are the so-called Earthquake Lights (EQLs). Continue reading The mystery of Earthquake Lights