Category Archives: In the news

The mystery of Earthquake Lights

Earthquake Lights on September 26, 1966 from the Matsushiro Quake, Japan.

During the Magnitude 8 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 8, 2017, most of the inevitable media hype was on the observation of mysterious blue lightning in the sky during the temblor. The lights witnessed by thousands of witnesses are the so-called Earthquake Lights (EQLs). Continue reading The mystery of Earthquake Lights

What are Harvey and Irma telling us?

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Mammoth-sized Hurricane Irma moving toward the Caribbran Islands. NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens and Jesse Allen, using VIIRS day-night band data from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership.

Two devastating Hurricanes in a row: first Harvey, then Irma. Texas was the first to suffer. Now it’s Florida’s turn to brace for the impact of Irma, among the strongest hurricanes ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean. Continue reading What are Harvey and Irma telling us?

Ischia: After 134 years, History repeats itself

When a tremor shook the Island of Ischia on August 21, causing two deaths and forcing 1500 people to leave their damaged homes, few seemed to remember that Ischia is a place prone to deadly quakes. The latest disaster on this beautiful Island happened during the same fatal summer of 1883, when Krakatoa wrought havoc in the southern hemispher, chancing Earth’s climate.

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Six Italian stars shed light on early Black Hole evolution

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Scientists have found evidence that supermassive black holes in the early universe grew intermittently in the first billion years after the Big Bang. Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ. of Rome/E.Pezzulli et al. Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

Six female Italian scientists have recently accomplished stunning results in the framework of one of the most challenging topics in modern Astrophysics. Five of these outstanding scientists have no fixed, tenure-track contract; three have not yet turned 30.

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Jupiter’s South Pole finally discovered

Betsy Asher Hall / Gervasio Robles | JPL-Caltech | SwRI/MSSS | NASA This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers). The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) in diameter. Multiple images taken with the JunoCam instrument on three separate orbits were combined to show all areas in daylight, enhanced color, and stereographic projection
Betsy Asher Hall / Gervasio Robles | JPL-Caltech | SwRI/MSSS | NASA
This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers).

Astronomers and scientists all over the world are amazed by the first results of Juno mission. About 40 papers have already been presented to discuss the new, stunning data coming from the NASA’s mission to Jupiter. Continue reading Jupiter’s South Pole finally discovered

Climate change denial hits unprecedented levels

Climate change skeptics, also called “deniers” or “negationists”, are the people who put in doubt the reality of global warming and related climate change. These days, climate change deniers from all over the world and from all sectors and walks of life — religious, academic, business, political, activist, social justice and citizenry – are gaining strength after the election of US President Donald Trump, the Great Denier.

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