Floods devastate the Balkans, causing epidemics and washing away landmines

On May 13, 2014, a huge low-pressure system designated “Yvette” formed when a cool mass of polar air from Central Europe mixed with humid, sub-tropical air from the Mediterranean Basin.

The low-pressure area moved to the Balkans, where it remained stationary for about two days, causing unprecedented rainfall over Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia. Continue reading Floods devastate the Balkans, causing epidemics and washing away landmines

Cyclone poleward shift threatens previously unaffected areas

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NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon

A study, led by a the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and published on May 15 in Nature, has revealed key information about the linkage between cyclone activity and the expansion of the tropics. Continue reading Cyclone poleward shift threatens previously unaffected areas

Coal mine explosion causes mayhem in Turkey, sparks mass riots

A disaster occurred in Turkey on May 13, when  787 miners were involved in an explosion due to technical problems at depth of 2000 m, in the Earth’s interior. They were working in an underground private coal mine located in Soma, 120 km away from Smirne.

A blaze, probably induced by a spark from a broken down transformer, killed 282 of them due to scorching heat and consequent lack of oxygen. Continue reading Coal mine explosion causes mayhem in Turkey, sparks mass riots

U.S. hurricanes and the “Butterfly effect”

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Africa: the source of U.S. hurricanes?

 “Does the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas?” The thought-provoking title of the breakthrough presentation given in 1972 by meteorologist Edward N. Lorenz at the 139th Meeting of the American Association for the Advacement of Science (AAAS) sounds as prophetic as ever, after 42 years. Continue reading U.S. hurricanes and the “Butterfly effect”