Tag Archives: NASA

Jupiter’s South Pole finally discovered

Betsy Asher Hall / Gervasio Robles | JPL-Caltech | SwRI/MSSS | NASA This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers). The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) in diameter. Multiple images taken with the JunoCam instrument on three separate orbits were combined to show all areas in daylight, enhanced color, and stereographic projection
Betsy Asher Hall / Gervasio Robles | JPL-Caltech | SwRI/MSSS | NASA
This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers).

Astronomers and scientists all over the world are amazed by the first results of Juno mission. About 40 papers have already been presented to discuss the new, stunning data coming from the NASA’s mission to Jupiter. Continue reading Jupiter’s South Pole finally discovered

New insights into the origin of Solar storms

Solar eruptive events caused by magnetic reconnection on the sun can lead to giant ejections of solar material, called coronal mass ejections. This one, as observed by the joint ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, traveled through space toward Earth in July 2012. Credits: ESA&NASA/SOHO
Solar eruptive events caused by magnetic reconnection on the sun can lead to giant ejections of solar material, called coronal mass ejections. This one, as observed by the joint ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, traveled through space toward Earth in July 2012.
Credits: ESA&NASA/SOHO

The Magnetospheric Multi Scale or MMS mission celebrates one year in space since it was launched in March 12, 2015. It’s now fully operative “in science mode” and collecting measurements with 4 spacecraft flying in a tetrahedral formation sampling the Earth’s magnetosphere and collecting pressure, velocity and temperature observations of charged particles in space. Continue reading New insights into the origin of Solar storms

Looking into Mercury’s secrets

Mercury globe - Credits: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington
Mercury globe – Credits: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

Mercury is the planet closest to the Sun and also the smallest in the Solar System. With a high-eccentricity orbit and a gravity which is about 3 times smaller than that on Earth, it takes about 88 days to complete its orbit around our Star. Continue reading Looking into Mercury’s secrets

What Earth 2.0 really means to us

Is there anybody out there?” sang the Pink Floyd in 1980, in their masterpiece double LP “The Wall”. Back then, there was little hope that humankind might ever discover Earth-like planets in the Universe. Thirty-five years later, the tune has changed: Today, chances are much greater that something or somebody will eventually get in touch with us from the depths of space.

452b_artistconcept_comparisonwithearth
Comparison between the Earth and Earth 2.0 (artistic concept). Image credit: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Continue reading What Earth 2.0 really means to us

Carbon dioxide concentrations reach record high

globalco2_air_201305
Global CO2 concentrations (parts per million) in May 2013. NASA Earth Observatory image by Rob Simmon and Jesse Allen with data courtesy the AIRS science team.

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and oceans have reached record levels in 2013, according to the annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin issued this week by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Continue reading Carbon dioxide concentrations reach record high